Do you know these 3 outdoor water filtration techniques?

There are many different and varying types of devices that will help you filter water whilst outdoors, but what are you supposed to do when you don’t have any of these devices on you? Many many years ago our ancestors filtered water for survival, and these techniques still work wonders today and they could just keep you alive in the worst case scenario that you lose your filtration device.

 

Boiling the water

Image courtesy of LearningLark on Flickr.
Image courtesy of LearningLark on Flickr.

If you find yourself in need of water for survival the easiest way to get  a large amount safe for you to drink is to boil it. This works wonders if there are many people who need the water. Only take running water to use for this technique as they are mostly safe to drink anyway, but be sure to check upstream to see if there is anything which could contaminate it. Get the water to the boil and keep it there for 60 seconds or so and you’ll have some lovely clean water.

 

Using moss for a quick sip

Image courtesy of Simon R. Rowell on Flickr.
Image courtesy of Simon R. Rowell on Flickr.

When you’re on the move and don’t have time to boil the water and you’re trying to keep moving, moss can be used to filter small amounts of water. The majority of the time some water will have collected inside the moss removing any large debris that would make it unsafe to drink, but be aware that it doesn’t fully purify water.

 

Pick up a small amount of moss and squeeze it over your mouth like a sponge to drip the water out. This will only work if the water seems ‘okay’ at first sight. You can also use this method to fill a bottle up to take with you as you walk.

 

Build a simple Water filter

Image courtesy of Simulina on Flickr.
Image courtesy of Simulina on Flickr.

Most of the materials found in filtration units can also be found in nature. Rock, gravel and charcoal are all used to purify water in filtration units. These can be quickly gathered and put together to build yourself a good filtration unit especially if the water is muddy or dirty to begin with.

 

Collect some sand and gravel up and put it into a container. Cut or poke some tiny holes in the bottom to let the purified water drain through, and place another container below to catch what drains out. You can repeat this process as many times as you feel you need to if the water still doesn’t look drinkable. It is important to always boil the water after this method before you drink it.